then they will clearly see the nature of the stars one by one

C.S. Lewis has a retired star (Ramandu) become a human father, and J.R.R. Tolkien has a man (Eärendil, Half-elven) carry a star into the heavens aboard his ship. Here are initial excerpts from Origen and the Life of the Stars: A History of an Idea by Alan Scott (Oxford UP):

The second-century apologist Tatian asks what good it is to know the size of the earth, the position of the stars, or the course of the sun, a sentiment echoed even by Clement of Alexandria, but Origen’s attitude is very different. His teachings on the elements, meteorology, comets, planets, and stars display a wide knowledge of contemporary science which is all the more impressive in light of the time he must have devoted to his scriptural studies and his vast literary output. As a result of these broad interests, his cosmology encompasses a degree of astronomical detail previously unknown in Christian (including gnostic) theology.

…Before discussing the question of whether heaven is part of this World, Origen remarks that the matter is too high for a human being to comprehend. …It is true that Origen cannot resist speculating on all of the questions about which he has so gravely warned us (here again he is like St Augustine), but this does not mean that the warnings are simply conventional: he means these flights of intellect or fancy to be taken as speculation and not as dogma. Origen (like Irenaeus) felt that many questions could only be decisively answered in the next life, believing that, since the visible world was only an image of an intelligible and invisible one, many problems could be better understood when we were in the kingdom of the heavens. This also was true of theories on the life of the stars: “When …the saints have reached the heavenly places, then they will clearly see the nature of the stars one by one, and will understand whether they are living beings or whatever else may be the case.” Origen recognizes an uncertainty here which he does not allow in other doctrinal issues.

…Origen weighs his teachings very differently, putting forward many ideas as conjectures, and it is sometimes difficult to know how seriously he takes these views. Though Origen certainly thought the stars are alive, it should be stated at the outset that there is some room for doubt in his mind. He notes that the tradition does not make clear whether the stars have life or not, and elsewhere he says that Job 25: 5, “the stars are not clean in his sight,” proves that the stars are capable of sin “unless this is a hyperbole.” The view that the stars possess life is not one to which Origen feels completely committed.

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