I find some versions of panpsychism quite attractive

David Bentley Hart said in this interview: You don’t need the morphology [of New Testament cosmology] to believe in a spiritually living creation that is full of spiritual life. You know, I’m something of a panpsychist myself. Not in the modern way, in which, you know, you’re supposed to believe that every atom has a kind ofContinue reading “I find some versions of panpsychism quite attractive”

a man who wanted to turn the whole world into a factory

Comments about secular modernity, Karl Marx, John Ruskin, classical liberalism, capitalism and nationalism from David Bentley Hart (in conversation with Jason Micheli) on Episode 230 of the Crackers and Grape Juice Podcast: David Bentley Hart— Once Upon a Time. This is my own transcription (used with permission but noting that all errors are my own): The wordContinue reading “a man who wanted to turn the whole world into a factory”

we distant children of the pagans would not be able to believe in any of these things

Modernity is what comes …when Christianity has been displaced from the center of a culture and deprived of any power explicitly to shape laws and customs, and has ceased to be regarded as the source of a society’s highest values or of a government’s legitimacy, and has ceased even to hold preeminent sway over aContinue reading “we distant children of the pagans would not be able to believe in any of these things”

all these beliefs rest securely upon a more fundamental and radical faith in the nothing

David Bentley Hart’s Atheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies (2009) lakes up a theme that he’s gone much farther with in recent articles: Those of us who now, in the latter days of modernity, are truest to the wisdom and ethos of our age place ourselves not at the disposal of God,Continue reading “all these beliefs rest securely upon a more fundamental and radical faith in the nothing”

true beauty is not the idea of the beautiful

David Bentley Hart (The Beauty of the Infinite, pp. 176-177): The harmony of Father and Son is not the absolute music of an undifferentiated noise, but the open, diverse, and complete polyphony of Father, Son, and Spirit. …The most elemental statement of theological aesthetics is that God is beautiful: not only that God is beautyContinue reading “true beauty is not the idea of the beautiful”

to believe in a spiritually living creation that is full of spiritual life

Here is my own transcription from a part of the Crackers & Grape Juice podcast by Jason Micheli “Episode 147 – David Bentley Hart: The Gloves Come Off” posted on April 13, 2018. [22:55] Hart: [N.T. Wright is] so hostile to the fact of the first century being Jewish and Greek at once (and Persian).Continue reading “to believe in a spiritually living creation that is full of spiritual life”

compared to the celebrations we like to hold on Twelfth Night

New Year’s is still a minor observance for us, and nothing to compared to the celebrations we like to hold on Twelfth Night, the eve of Epiphany, when the last of the Christmas presents are opened, games are played, and the decorations come down from the tree. (I know many Americans think of Christmas asContinue reading “compared to the celebrations we like to hold on Twelfth Night”

Christ in Fairyland

From “The Secret Commonwealth” by David Bentley Hart (October 2009): One need not believe in fairies to grasp that there is no good reason why one ought not to do so. To see the world as inhabited by these vital intelligences, or to believe that behind the outward forms of nature there might be anContinue reading “Christ in Fairyland”

this distance that allows for an endless setting out from and homecoming to the object of attention belongs to beauty

If the realm of created difference has its being for God’s pleasure (Rev. 4:11), then the distance of creation from God and every distance within creation belong originally to an interval of appraisal and approbation, the distance of delight. God’s pleasure—the beauty creation possesses in his regard—underlies the distinct being of creation. …Within the world,Continue reading “this distance that allows for an endless setting out from and homecoming to the object of attention belongs to beauty”