words belong to each other

Words survive the chops and changes of time longer than any other substance, therefore they are the truest. …The moment we single out and emphasize the suggestions as we have done here they become unreal; and we, too, become unreal — specialists, word mongers, phrase finders, not readers. In reading we have to allow theContinue reading “words belong to each other”

words so terrible you heard them with your whole body

And there was a voice above the firmament that was over their heads; when they stood, they let down their wings. She didn’t want to know what the verse meant, what the creatures were. She knew there were words so terrible you heard them with your whole body. Guilty. And there were voices to sayContinue reading “words so terrible you heard them with your whole body”

Jesus admits that this woman has bested him

This woman, however, just will not give up: “Then she came and prostrated before him, saying, ‘Lord, help me!’” (Matthew 15:25). The scene is becoming embarrassing. Can things get worse? Yes, they can—and do: “But he answered and said, ‘It is not good to take the children’s bread and throw it to the puppies.’” Oh,Continue reading “Jesus admits that this woman has bested him”

a first city that remains implicit

From Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino: “To distinguish the other cities’ qualities, I must speak of a first city that remains implicit. For me it is Venice.” “…Memory’s images, once they are fixed in words, are erased,” Polo said. “Perhaps I am afraid of losing Venice all at once, if I speak of it. OrContinue reading “a first city that remains implicit”

the world of words had a glamour and wonder

In reading The Classical Trivium by Marshal McLuhan, I’ve appreciate much about it, including his idea that the patterns of grammar are grounded in the patterns of the physical creation and that both the worlds of language and creation provide rich and myriad symbols pointing to “the creative Trinity” (36). See this passage for exampleContinue reading “the world of words had a glamour and wonder”

promises to keep

Two masterpieces, with Auden echoing Frost: Their Lonely Betters W.H. Auden (1950) As I listened from a beach-chair in the shade To all the noises that my garden made, It seemed to me only proper that words Should be withheld from vegetables and birds. A robin with no Christian name ran through The Robin-Anthem whichContinue reading “promises to keep”